Dry by Neal & Jarrod Shusterman | Book Review

Book: Dry

Author: Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman

Release Date: Oct. 2, 2018

Synopsis

The drought—or the Tap-Out, as everyone calls it—has been going on for a while now. Everyone’s lives have become an endless list of don’ts: don’t water the lawn, don’t fill up your pool, don’t take long showers.
Until the taps run dry.
Suddenly, Alyssa’s quiet suburban street spirals into a warzone of desperation; neighbours and families turned against each other on the hunt for water. And when her parents don’t return and her life—and the life of her brother—is threatened, Alyssa has to make impossible choices if she’s going to survive.
 

Format: Physical Advanced Reader Copy (found at library sale, not given to me by the publisher)

Length: 389 pages

Rating: ★★★★☆ (4/5)

Review

img_1446Dry is an apocalyptic-esque thriller, multiple perspective story on the desperation that follows when Southern California runs dry. It starts from people stealing cases on water from each other at CostCo and quickly devolves into doing absolutely whatever it takes to survive.

All of the main characters are teenagers, which means there was a good chunk of the middle where I had to stop reading, turn to my S.O. and say “THESE KIDS ARE SO DUMB!” or “Listen to the 10-year-old! Your plan is stupid.” But hey, I’ve watched a lot of disaster movies so I’m pretty judgy.

This is also my first Neal Shusterman book, so I’m not sure if this is just his style or not, but there were a lot of heavy-handed metaphorical or “deep thought” statements that you’d typically see at the end of an important passage or at the end of books, but that were just thrown around every page or so. I couldn’t help but roll my eyes at the “momentous” moments these 16-year-old kids were internal monologuing about. (Oh god the more I type, the more I want to lower the rating).

One more gripe. This book had real stakes and bad things happen. But I couldn’t help but feel at the end that none of their decisions actually mattered? Like if they had decided to stay versus go or this way or that, it seems like the ending would’ve been the same. The main characters didn’t bring about the end of the book, so the deus ex machina element to this made the ending a bit of a let down for me.

Ok, so let’s say it’s a 3.5 star that I’m rounding up. If you like Neal Shusterman’s style, you’ll likely enjoy this more than me. I’m still going to give Scythe a chance to see if I like his dystopians more.

Magic 2.0 Series Review (so far) | Sunday in Review

Synopsis: Magic 2.0 is a comic science-fiction/fantasy series of books written by Scott Meyer. The series so far consists of five novels, the first being Off To Be the Wizard. The series follows Martin Banks, a programmer from 2012, who uses a computer file that allows him to alter reality to time travel to medieval England where he joins a community of other computer programmers posing as wizards.

My history with this series goes back to hearing Book Roast talk about reading the first book nearly a year ago. At the time I searched my libraries and none of them had a copy, so it stayed on my Goodreads To-Read shelf, perhaps to be forgotten. But I finally got my chance when I saw Scribd had the first 3 books on audio, which I read in August, and I got the latest two books on Audible, which I finished up this weekend.

Continue reading “Magic 2.0 Series Review (so far) | Sunday in Review”

Review of “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” by Jonathan Safran Foer

Thomas Schell (sr.) tattooed Yes and No on his hands after he lost his words.
Thomas Schell (sr.) tattooed Yes and No on his hands after he lost his words.

If you, like me, saw the movie adaptation of ” Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” you are under the impression that a son who lost his father in 9/11 is the whole story. Reading the book, I realized that’s only half of it — literally.

On its surface, the book is about Oskar Schell and his attempt to cope with losing his father in 9/11. His father had always played games with him and made him investigate everything. So when Oskar finds an envelope with the name “Black” written on it and a key inside, he thinks it’s his father’s last great mystery. Continue reading “Review of “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” by Jonathan Safran Foer”