Review of “Room” by Emma Donoghue

room coverHello, everyone!

I’d like to start out with a little back-story with this book up for my review.

I was strolling through my Books-a-Million passing the time waiting for the excruciatingly slow city bus to come. It was extremely masochistic of me, surrounding myself with books; it was nearing the end of the month, so I barely had money left in my budget. Bibliophiles and stretched college funds just don’t mix, people! Continue reading “Review of “Room” by Emma Donoghue”

Review of “This is Where I Leave You” by Jonathan Tropper

This is where i leave youI bought “This is Where I Leave You” by Jonathan Tropper for three reasons:

  1. I had $4 left on a gift card to Books-a-Million and the book had an attractive $3 sale sticker on the cover.
  2. I liked the aforementioned cover
  3. That aforementioned cover said New York Times Bestseller on it.

Reading the book a few weeks later I find that it’s about a dysfunctional family — my favorite. Judd Foxman’s dad has just lost his battle with cancer, which bring his family together for the first time in years. And when I say “together,” I mean in vicinity (definitely not emotionally). Continue reading “Review of “This is Where I Leave You” by Jonathan Tropper”

Review of “The Illicit Happiness of Other People” by Manu Joseph

Illicit featured imageThe Illicit Happiness of Other People” by Manu Joseph

OK, first a little bit of plot summary:

The Chacko family is one with a tragic past. Unni Chacko, a very talented cartoonist, is only 17 years old when he falls from the family’s third floor balcony. Reality has it that he didn’t just fall — he jumped.

Flash forward three years to Ousep Chacko, a washed up, old journalist who staggers home every night and yells drunken slurs for the whole block to hear. Depending on your psychological outlook, he may seem like a father who doesn’t care or a father who cares deeply. Nevertheless, when he receives a long-lost comic that Unni had mailed to an unknown recipient the day “he did what he did,” Ousep starts questioning everyone in Unni’s mysterious life in an attempt to answer the riddle of his son’s death.

Continue reading “Review of “The Illicit Happiness of Other People” by Manu Joseph”